Latest News on Migration

  • How Digital Bangladesh can fulfill dreams

    Sabrina Afrin Riza is 15 years old. She graduated from SSC at the Moheshkhali Government Girls’ High School, dreaming of a career in medicine. But her father and his small wood business could not afford to pay for her dreams. 

    Sabrina’s mother was supportive but, as a housewife, all she could offer was emotional support, not financial. That’s when Sabrina knew the only way she could realize her dreams was by working and saving up the money to attend medical school.

    On an island as small and quaint as hers, however, it was a plan easier made than put into action. 

  • Bringing them home

    Every year, nearly 1 million people migrate from Bangladesh for work. They contribute a significant amount of over $15 billion in remittances to Bangladesh. While some fortunate migrants have a positive experience, regrettably many, particularly those who are low-skilled, face inordinate challenges, exploitation, and abuse at every stage of their journey.

  • Human trafficking in the coastal belt

    Imagine living in an isolated area of Bangladesh. The roads, if any, that lead to these areas are mostly inaccessible. There are hardly any schools to prepare the children for a better future; nor are there any jobs that these children can aspire to, once their education is complete.

    There are barely any medical services available. Every day, surviving in this remote hamlet is a challenge. Yet, hundreds and thousands of Bangladeshis soldier on, because this is the only option they have. This is the only home they’ve ever known.

  • A hero among us

    Twenty-five-year-old Noyon, studying at Premtholi Degree College in Rajshahi, had no idea that his life was about to change drastically. One day, a local agent offered him a job in Malaysia which would pay Tk40,000 a month -- which was a dream salary for him.

    Noyon readily agreed. The agent told him that he needed a passport, a medical checkup, and a plane ticket, all of which would cost him Tk2 lakh. Noyon scraped every single barrel he could and somehow managed to arrange the money. 

  • Gap Inc. and IOM enter into license agreement to support impacted communities and migrants in Bangladesh

    Dhaka – Global retailer Gap Inc. and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) have signed an agreement that will enable IOM to implement the company’s innovative Personal Advancement & Career Enhancement (P.A.C.E.) curriculum modules in Bangladesh.

  • Prottasha – Creating Hope for Migrants Returning from Europe

    Dhaka – The International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s European Union (EU)-funded flagship Prottasha project yesterday hosted a high-level event for key migration stakeholders to highlight its contribution to the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) and advocate for greater coordination among key actors for humane and orderly migration management in Bangladesh.

  • IOM set to launch International Recruitment Integrity System in Bangladesh

    Dhaka – The UN Migration Agency, IOM with the support of the European Union, organized a day long workshop in Dhaka to enhance commitment of key stakeholders for protecting rights of migrant workers as they it gears up to launch the International Recruitment Integrity System (IRIS) in Bangladesh.

  • Bangladesh’s Largest Job Site, UN Migration Agency Partner to Combat Unethical Recruitment Practices

    Dhaka – The UN Migration Agency (IOM) is partnering with Bangladesh’s largest online job portal Bdjobs.com Ltd. to provide the latest information to job seekers on overseas employment opportunities and connect them directly with employers. The two agencies on Sunday (11/11) signed a Memorandum of Understanding to create a new online portal that expects to go live within six months.

  • Bangladeshi Survivors of Andaman Sea Crisis Find New Livelihoods in Hydroponic Farming

    Dhaka– IOM has established three large-scale vegetable farms equipped with hydroponic farming technologies to support the sustainable economic reintegration of a group of Bangladeshi migrants who returned home after the 2015 Andaman Sea crisis. 

  • OP-ED: INTERNATIONAL MIGRANTS DAY 2018 By António Vitorino, Director General International Organization for Migration (IOM)

    Migration is the great issue of our era. Migration With Dignity (#WithDignity) is the theme of 2018’s International Migrants Day, which we observe on Tuesday (18 December).

    Dignity is at the core of our mission. Treating all migrants with dignity is the fundamental requirement we face before anything else we attempt on migration—a troubling issue coming at a troubling time for the world community—because our future depends on it. So, too, does our present.